BERINGER PIANO EXERCISES PDF

My comments are intended for those who aspire to the highest levels of performance, although even those with modest aspirations can benefit from thinking about these things. This may seem counter-intuitive, but such an approach is specious, pedagogically lazy, and not well-thought-out. Even now, guitar study—good or bad—is not available at every college or university that has a music program. Pedagogical Advice?

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My comments are intended for those who aspire to the highest levels of performance, although even those with modest aspirations can benefit from thinking about these things. This may seem counter-intuitive, but such an approach is specious, pedagogically lazy, and not well-thought-out. Even now, guitar study—good or bad—is not available at every college or university that has a music program. Pedagogical Advice?

Often I ceased to regard the motif I had chosen as part of a specific work and elevated it to a superior level of studies in which was latent the promise of victory over more general difficulties. Does it mean he created a new exercise modeled after the technique needed for a passage, or does it mean he extracted a passage from the piece and the passage itself was the exercise?

Or could it mean something else? The Bungler and Acrobat Part Carl Flesch — , whose words I used for the title of this post, rebuts the use of pieces for technical development in his book The Art of Violin Playing from Some recommend musical practice on a logical, others on a mechanical basis. In reality, a technically perfected performance can only result after the student has formed the right conception of the movements required for it, and then is able to find the proper transferring mechanism for them.

An exaggerated preoccupation with one of these factors develops either intelligent bunglers or brainless acrobats. Flesch makes a distinction between general technique and applied technique. General technique includes the mastery of scales, arpeggios, slurs, intervals, and so on; applied technique is the cultivation of general technique in repertoire pieces.

The technical level of ability demanded for the reproduction of a work should already have been attained by means of general technical studies. Flesch certainly had more experience training violinists than Segovia had training guitarists.

Segovia was never responsible for the long-term development of a student except for himself. The act of mastering scales, arpeggios, slurs, and other techniques, means one has learned to solve problems, the solutions to which can be quickly transferred and applied to the requirements of a composition technical practice is not so one can mindlessly repeat technical patterns on auto-pilot. When musical meaning is lost, impersonalization begins and priorities begin to shift.

But, pianists did write a lot, and much of what is true for piano study is true for guitar study. Unfailing as my admiration of your gigantic talent has always been, I never believed it possible that I should one day esteem you as highly as I did Joachim, when I heard him play the Beethoven Concerto. Every note you play is golden, the quintessence of musical feeling. Ehrlich, the editor , but there are numerous exercises covering all sort of pianistic textures and problems. Leschetizky: No friend of theoretical methods The most famous piano teacher of the late nineteenth century was Theodor Leschetizky — , who taught a number of legendary pianists, including Ignacy Jan Paderewski , Ignaz Friedman , Artur Schnabel , and Mark Hambourg.

Of course, there may be individual passages which require some special technical study, but, generally speaking, technic is worthless unless the hands and the mind of the player are so trained that they can encompass the principal difficulties found in modern compositions.

This is first done through the extensive study of exercises by Hanon, then Tausig and Czerny. All technic reverts to these simple materials and the student is made to understand this from his very entrance to the conservatory.

As the time goes on the scales and arpeggios become more difficult, more varied, more rapid, but they are never omitted from the daily work. I have been amazed to find pupils coming from America who have been able to play a few pieces fairly well, but who wonder why they find it difficult to extend their musical sphere when the whole trouble lies in an almost total absence of regular daily technical work systematically pursued through several years.

Often these pupils have real talent and cannot be blamed. They simply have had no teacher in the early years with patience and sufficient will power to hold them back until they have been exhaustively drilled in scales and arpeggios. A smattering will not do. Do your technic at one time and your pieces at another. Approach the two sections with different aspects. Passing under of the thumb—Scales—Arpeggios. The technique of double notes and polyphonic playing. The technique of extensions.

The technique of the wrist—The execution of chords. Within each chapter are several series of exercises. Some might disagree with their interpretations, but no one can deny that these pianists were artists with a vision for the music they played, and they had the means to express that vision.

None of them advocated a method of study that ignored the rigorous practice of well-organized technical exercises. Everyone writes that technique is only a means to an end, the end being the artistic performance of music. Of course it is, and it hardly needs restating.

That technique is the means to an end indicates that this equation should only flow one way. Trying to develop technique by only playing pieces is no different from thinking that playing pieces is an end to a means, which is pretty confusing, and rightly so. Try it like this: playing music is only a means to a technical end. Who wants that? Both will end up compromised.

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Nabei A lot of jazz players seem to like the Beringer book. I have no idea if the guy is brazilian or what. Hi thumper49, I think if they are challenging this is very positive. She told me that when she was studying piano at university in Romania she set herself a goal of devoting one hour per day to Cortot for one year and swears that it changed her hand completely, for the better, in strength and independence.

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