ELMIRA JACKALS PDF

Eventually, they severed ties with the Blue Jackets and became an independent operation for the rest of their years in the league. During their tenure in the UHL, their average attendance was 3, per game, which included 31 sellouts. The largest crowd was a standing-room-only of 4, on October 13, Playoff History Edit The team made a splash in their first season by immediately making the playoffs. Improving dramatically in the off-season, the Jackals won the Eastern Conference for the first time, in just their second season.

Author:Yok Saktilar
Country:Mongolia
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Spiritual
Published (Last):2 April 2008
Pages:410
PDF File Size:14.7 Mb
ePub File Size:9.10 Mb
ISBN:840-7-97449-332-2
Downloads:31139
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Tygolrajas



External links On March 10, , after unsuccessfully trying to the sell the team and the arena, the Chemung County Industrial Development Agency made an agreement to sell the arena to Brian Barrett but not the Jackals. The Jackals would fold after the end of the season.

Eventually, they severed ties with the Blue Jackets and were unaffiliated for the rest of their years in the UHL. During this time, their average attendance was 3, per game and they had 31 sellouts.

Their largest crowd was a standing-room of 4,, on October 13, Prior to their first season, their home arena was still not complete and the Jackals spent the first 10 games of their inaugural season on the road. The Jackals returned to their unfinished arena in Elmira for their first home game, on November 11, Overall, the Jackals finished that season 32—33—9 for second place in the Northeast Division and a berth in the UHL playoffs.

Elmira was named franchise of the year for the UHL. The Jackals lost in the first round. Old Elmira Jackals logo from UHL In their second season, the Jackals earned a 45—21—8 record with 98 points for first in the East in the regular season. In the playoffs, they won Eastern Conference Championship before falling to the Muskegon Fury in the Colonial Cup finals four-games-to-two. They once again lost to the Fury in a four-game sweep. In —05 , the Jackals fired head coach Todd Brost mid-season after posting a 19—35—5 record.

The Jackals did not qualify for the playoffs for the first time. After another unsuccessful season, the Jackals hired a new general manager, Robbie Nichols , and a new coach, Kris Waltze. At the beginning of the —07 season , Waltze posted a 13—13—0 record before being demoted to assistant coach and Nichols taking over as head coach. Nichols led the team to a 9—12—1 before he suffered a minor stroke during an away game.

Paul Gillis then filled in as head coach for the remainder of the season where the Jackals would finish last in the division. Returning from a loss in Cincinnati , the team bus was involved in crash on Interstate 90 in Pennsylvania early in the morning of November 29, , where several players sustained minor injuries. The Jackals completed the season with a 41—24—0—7 with 89 points to finish second in the North Division.

However, their success was short lived as they lost in the conference quarterfinals to the Reading Royals , 4-games-to During the —09 regular season, the Jackals went 39—26—2—5 for 85 points to finish third in the North Division. The Jackals were able to clinch a playoff berth but fell in the second round to the Cincinnati Cyclones, 4-games-to The team further improved under Martinson during the —10 regular season when the Jackals finished first in the East Division and made the ECHL playoffs for the third straight season.

However, the Jackals fell in the first round to the Florida Everblades , 4-games-to Malcolm Cameron succeeded Martinson as head coach before the —11 season but was replaced mid-season by former coach and general manager Robbie Nichols. The Jackals finished the season with a third-place finish in the North Division and their fourth consecutive ECHL playoff berth but fell in the first round to the Greenville Road Warriors , 3-games-to Ownership issues — Pat Bingham was then hired as head coach for the —12 season.

The Jackals continued to play not knowing if or when they would be locked out by the County. Fact of the matter is the money was here to pay the taxes. And the fact is Robbie Nichols told the Afrs it was paid. The Jackals advanced to the Kelly Cup playoffs for their fifth straight season, falling in the second round to the Florida Everblades, 4-games-to The Legislature ratified the agreement on July 9, On July 24, , the County announced that First Arena would be sold to local businessman Tom Freeman, at the completion of the —13 season.

On September 8, , Jackals head coach Pat Bingham resigned one month before the season started. At the start of the season, the Jackals announced that they were now "community owned. The owner indicated that an attendance of 3, would have been the break-even point for a profit.

Under Leger, the team struggled and was in last place in the league, leading management to release him on January 13, As part of the agreement, it was announced that the Elmira Jackals would cease operations at the end of the season.

Season-by-season record.

ARINC 453 PDF

Elmira Jackals

Eventually, they severed ties with the Blue Jackets and became an independent operation for the rest of their years in the league. During their tenure in the UHL, their average attendance was 3, per game, which included 31 sellouts. The largest crowd was a standing-room-only of 4, on October 13, Playoff History Edit The team made a splash in their first season by immediately making the playoffs. Improving dramatically in the off-season, the Jackals won the Eastern Conference for the first time, in just their second season. They even got as far as playing the Muskegon Fury in the Colonial Cup finals, but lost in a hard fought 6 game series.

KENSINGTON 33197 MANUAL PDF

Page Search

External links On March 10, , after unsuccessfully trying to the sell the team and the arena, the Chemung County Industrial Development Agency made an agreement to sell the arena to Brian Barrett but not the Jackals. The Jackals would fold after the end of the season. Eventually, they severed ties with the Blue Jackets and were unaffiliated for the rest of their years in the UHL. During this time, their average attendance was 3, per game and they had 31 sellouts. Their largest crowd was a standing-room of 4,, on October 13,

Related Articles